December 22, 2012

Road Trip

Posted in Journey, Progress, Strategies tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 6:47 pm by Reva

I’ve just made the 300km trip to my hometown to spend Christmas with my family.  It’s a long trip when you have a chronic illness and are travelling alone (well, with a dog) but it’s a good opportunity to have a good think.

1km

Coffee break.  Okay, so I planned this to avoid making and cleaning up breakfast.  Poor Dog thought she was going to a play date, but just enough time to grab a quick coffee, a piece of toast and read the first two pages of the paper

coffee

17km

Where’s the cruise button gone? Same place that the volume control is on the steering wheel.  I don’t have it.  I’m not driving one of the work cars.

63km

As I’m going through a slightly windy part of the route I remember a conversation I had with my mum in the same spot 12 years.  I’d just bought my first car and we were driving home.  Dad was driving ahead and Mum decided she needed to tell him something.  She was going to phone him and I suggested that maybe as we were in a fairly remote area we probably wouldn’t have reception.  She couldn’t understand why that would be the case when we could see his car.  Sorry mum, they’re not walky talkies

120km

I’ve remembered 4 things that I’m sure I’ve forgotten.  Nothing urgent, just inconvenient.

124km

I’ve forgotten what it was that I remembered I’d forgotten.

136km

Time to stretch our legs in the largest town along our route, a thriving metropolis of 2300 people!  Coax the dog out of the car.  Wander around letting her sniff things.   Coax her back into the car with treats.  Check the boot to see if maybe I remembered to pack the lollies.  Nope, I really did forget them.

149km

One of my favourite road signs.  Sounds much more pleasant than a bumpy road.

 bumpy road

My other favourite is “Fatigue Kills”.  It hasn’t got me yet!!

167km

The scenery

photo

180km

swamp

I’ve been driving this road regularly for the past four years.  It was only during floods about 18months ago that I realised this was swampland.  Prior to that the droughts in the area had dried it out.

197km

Starting to fade.  I could do with those lollies.  I know they’d make me feel terrible later but a sugar high would help me get through the last 100km

209km

Christmas in rural Australia – I was hoping to see the old scarecrows that a farmer dresses up as a Christmas family watching TV would be out but I either missed them or they’ve been put away.

christmas letter box

213km

A duck? Out here? Just out of the corner of my eyes I’m sure that’s what I saw.  Can’t have.  Hold on, could have been a snake, a brown snake curled up with its head up.  Hmm.  Not going back to find out.

228km

Straight ahead and behind.  The farmers in this region have had it really tough.  After a decade of drought there were massive floods through the region about 18 months ago.  Now everything is so dry again.  Many farmers are unsuccessfully trying to sell up, and walking off the land.

aheadbackward

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

247km

I could really do with a bathroom break thanks to the coffee and the attempt to keep hydrated…but you saw the scenery

263km

There’s some fantastic Australian music on my playlist.  I just hit play on the alphabetical list and am finding myself singing along to some oldies but goodies (You Am I, Powderfinger ) as well as some newies (The Rubans, San cisco).

287km

Nearly home…the ground starts to turn red.

red dirt

298km

Made it

the end

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December 13, 2012

Angst-ridden Adolescence

Posted in Journey tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , at 8:32 pm by Reva

If you don’t like listening to whiney tweens/teens, it might be a good to stop reading now because I suspect I may end up sounding like one before this ends.  I’m having one of those situations that as a grown up I know I should just get over but for some reason my mind reverts back to my insecure youth. But I’m quickly learning that if I get something that’s bothering me down on paper (or computer screen) the answer comes to me, or if it doesn’t I still stop thinking about it.

I have a friend who I had considered a close friend.  She lived in another town, as most of my close friends do.  We spoke most days by long SMS conversations.  We’d give each other support and advice about things going on in our lives.  About two years ago she relocated to the town where I live.  She stayed at my house for three months while the settlement for her house came through.  We talked about all the things we’d do now we lived only 2 blocks apart.  We could have meals together each week.  We could go for walks together after work.  We’d try to work out the best place to become our “local” for regular Friday night drinks.  We’d go to markets.  We’d watch our favourite TV shows together.

When her settlement came through I bought her house warming gifts, and baked gluten free treats for her guests.  And then everything stopped.  I invited her for dinner – she was busy.  Her mum was staying (I know her mum, we buy each other birthday and Christmas gifts).  He uncle was coming to do some work on her house.  She got a dog and had to take it to dog school.  I took a step back and decided to let her settle at her own pace.

I went out and decided to join a community group, something we’d talked about doing together that she suddenly was no longer interested in doing.  I got on with my life.  Occasionally if it was appropriate I’d ask her to come to local events with me, things that we’d talked about doing in the past but she was always busy, her mum was visiting, she didn’t like crowds or she was broke.  We’d still catch up, but only on her terms, and only at McCafe, with our two dogs tied up next to us.  It was her 30th birthday early this year.  She’d done some lovely things for my 30th and I wanted to return the favour.  I asked her out for High Tea.  She was busy, her mum was here and she had to take the dog to dog school, and she couldn’t afford it, could we go somewhere else, like McCafe?

A few months ago she had severe gastro.  I offered to get her some things from the shops.  I had my head bitten off, if that’s possible via SMS.  I knew she was unwell and let it go.  I grabbed some lemonade, dry biscuits and a magazine and left it by her front door.  When she thanked me I told her that I understood what it was like to be stuck at home sick, and that even if you don’t feel like talking to anyone it’s still nice to know someone is there for you.

A few months later when I had my crash she didn’t repay the favour.  She asked me to catch up the following Saturday for coffee – because she had to go to the shops anyway.  In the past I would have dropped anything, but generally being in a better place I said no, I was unwell and it would be too much for me.  She asked what was wrong and when I told her there was nothing.  No enquiry as to whether I needed anything brought to me, or done for me.  A few days later she asked something again and I apologised and reiterated my previous comments.  I didn’t go into great detail other than I was too unwell to go out.  If I hadn’t had my epiphany about friendships I probably would have been really cut up about it but by now the behaviour was so prolonged I would have been shocked if there’d been any recognition.

Last Christmas we caught up for take away pizza in a local park where the dogs sat tied to a fence.  This year I thought it would be nice to have something a little less stressful – juggling wrapping paper, Christmas gifts, pizza and dogs on a park bench – so asked if she wanted to do the same thing but in my back yard so the dogs could be free to run and we wouldn’t have to juggle.  The response? I’m busy, maybe but mum will be here soon so it’ll have to be before she gets here.  I’d rather go to McCafe.

So suddenly the brilliant place I was in a few months ago is gone and I feel like I’m back to the insecure self I have been in the past, and don’t know why I’m there – I’m plenty busy enough without worrying about this stuff.  I feel I’ve been demoted to the McCafe friend.  I don’t want to go to McCafe.  McCafe have hard plastic uncomfortable seats that make me ache all the following day.  I can’t bring myself to reply because I’m swinging between being a softy grown up (“Sure, McCafe sounds wonderful.  How’s Monday at 5.30?”), a sooky anxious adolescent (“have I done something to upset you? Don’t you want to be my friend anymore?” – to which I envision the reply “well if you don’t know, I’m not telling you”) and the slightly unpleasant (“nope, actually McCafe sucks, especially for a Christmas celebration.  If that’s all I’m good for let’s just skip it”).

let-take-down-notch-friendship-ecard-someecards

November 4, 2012

It’s Beginning to Look a Little Like Christmas

Posted in Food tagged , , , , , , , , , at 5:01 pm by Reva

I haven’t made a Christmas cake in years, probably because I don’t eat them much and I still have one from four years ago in my pantry.  But I’m a bit of a kid at heart and figure it’s time to start thinking seriously about Christmas (oh yeah, and I have a chronic illness which, if I don’t start preparing early, is likely to turn around and bite me on the bum).  Last weekend I found a recipe in a CWA cook book that was sooooo easy.  I hardly had to standing up at all and there were hardly any dishes to do at the end.  What more could a girl with ME/CFS ask for?

This was so simple.  Saturday night I poured 1.5kg of mixed dried fruit in a bowl.  I sprinkled in some sherry (I didn’t bother measuring), some treacle, a cup of sugar and a grated apple.  I mixed it all together, covered it and left it over night.

The next morning I took off the cover and it smelt like Christmas!!  In a separate bowl I mixed together some flour and mixed spices with some melted butter which had cooled, then stirred in 4 eggs.  Once this was all mixed, I poured it over the macerated fruit, folded it all together and poured it into a prepared cake tin.  I’m not a lover of the white icing so I made pretty patterns on the top with almonds and cherries instead.

Then I popped it into a slow oven and spent a good two to three hours pottering in the garden and reading the Sunday paper while it cooked!!